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Jax
03-20-2010, 06:15 PM
What do you do when you are having one of those days where no matter how you try, A Big Fat “SKUNKED” appears to be the out come of a hard days Fly Fishing?
Do you hope that Luck will eventually bring a reward, or do you dig into the recesses your memory bank of Skill and Ability attributes, and try to filter out a strategy that will save the day?
The Question is.
Is Luck as important an attribute as Skill and/or Ability to the average Fly Fisher? Jax ;) :shh:

Gerard
03-21-2010, 04:49 AM
Jax, the famous South African golfer Gary Player once said “The more I practise the luckier I get”. I think that holds true, but at the same time some guys seem to be able to pull out fish from coffee mugs. Point is, there’s not much you can do about luck, but you can always improve your skill and we all know the feeling when those two meet up. :D

Danny S
03-21-2010, 06:08 AM
I believe skill and ability are a little higher on the scale than luck, but all three come into play. Those days when one person is catching but another is not--more than likely that's skill related. Those days when no one is catching--likely luck. If the fish just aren't feeding or when weather or water conditions are terrible, that's luck to me.

Jax
03-21-2010, 02:52 PM
I think Gerard has hit the nail on the head, and a combination of both Skill and Luck working in unison is the making of what nowdays is called MOJO.

I also agree that when both Luck and Skill are working well together. The feeling is something akin to Rapture.

Ernest
03-22-2010, 11:02 AM
I believe in beginner’s luck. Beginner’s luck is the fishing gods’ way of showing us what’s possible. Once we’re past the beginner’s stage, we make our own luck.

The lucky fisherman studies his quarry, and knows where he lives, where he takes his meals, and what type of fly or lure or bait will interest him.

The lucky fisherman studies the fish’s home, can lean over the bridge to look at the water and have a pretty good idea of what’s going on upstream. Then he can drive down to the next bridge, look at the water and have a pretty good idea of what’s going on between.

The lucky fisherman has learned both the possibilities and the limitations of his equipment, and has taught himself how to use it effectively within those boundaries.

The lucky fisherman need not be tall and brute strong, but he has the stamina to wade through all weathers and withstand the rigors of stinging insects and the threats of wild skunks and bears, staying on the water long enough so he’s there when the fish finally start to bite.

The luckiest fisherman of all is my friend Ted, my hero and my role model. Ted will go out with the young guys and catch a handful of trout. While the young guys keep battling the brush and scaring the trout, Ted smiles and says “The world doesn’t owe me another fish.” Then he lies down on the bank and takes a nap. I’m hoping for that kind of luck.

Mostyn
03-22-2010, 07:46 PM
Yes! there are many attributes to consider! Skill & knowledge obtained over a period of learning; and every one needs a little luck occasionally! Then there is the weather, the condition of the river or stream to consider! also what time of year we pursue our quarrie? as you well know! The conditions can change from day to day - week by week, every month or any kind of alteration in our seasonal calendar, can affect our success rate when fishing. Everyone will experience a BLANK and fish-less day, from time to time! You will only catch fish when they're feeding; and I do NOT believe that fish are continually feeding! it is on those occasions that you will have nothing to offer; and you will fail to capture your quarrie! But, Personally, I still enjoy my fishing, even on those very very rare occasions, when everything in your fly box and all your skill an knowledge, are of no use what-so-ever! That is why it's called fishing! Catching, is just a bonus to fishing and being out in the countryside enjoying the environment! Although, I would consider myself very fortunate and extremely lucky to have had very few of those Blank Days!

Guess I must have learned some skills along the way; and found pleasure in doing so!

adam
03-23-2010, 11:51 PM
What do you do when you are having one of those days where no matter how you try, A Big Fat “SKUNKED” appears to be the out come of a hard days Fly Fishing?
Do you hope that Luck will eventually bring a reward, or do you dig into the recesses your memory bank of Skill and Ability attributes, and try to filter out a strategy that will save the day?
The Question is.
Is Luck as important an attribute as Skill and/or Ability to the average Fly Fisher? Jax ;) :shh:

Jax, it's not the "bouz" days that get me, it's the day where I am sticking my fly in the tree, I wad up my leader, twice in a couple of casts, flub a presentation, frustration. The frustration of not doing anything smooth, those are the days that I dread. It does not happen often and my remedy is to persist and try to not let it get to me.

The long rod will help me to stay with the fish, it is stealth on another scale.

I am my own worst enemy.

I like what Gerard quoted Gary Player as saying, that sums it for me.

Jax
03-24-2010, 02:54 AM
Adam; you have painted a perfect picture of what, like you I dread more than anything when out fishing.

Can't set the hook all day even though the rise to the fly is perfect.

The sudden jarring stop of the rod during the presentation cast as a hungry tree gobbles up the fly.

Changing the fly and sifting through the grass in a vain attempt to find the wee flies the wind blew out of the compartment of the fly box the moment you opened it.

Fly Fishing; I Love It !!!! :bigthumb: Jax

Gerard
03-24-2010, 04:46 AM
There’s another phenomenon called “monkey on your back”. It starts with making a chirp aimed at your fishing buddy right at the start of the day. Once that “monkey” gets on your back there’s no letting go and it will ride you all day long. :shaking2:

It so happened that Robert, Bertus and I went fishing for trout last week. On the very first fish, Bertus was a bit quick on the strike and missed the fish on the dry, so Robert chirped “You have to say God save the queen before striking…” The next fish Bertus was a tad slow, with the same result, and Robert chirped “You don’t have to sing the whole anthem, just the phrase God save the queen…” Of course, that securely fastened the “monkey” on Robert’s back and he had a spade of “bad luck” I have not witnessed before. I think he missed the next 20 trout and do what he may; he just could not set the hook for the life of him.

Beware the monkey gents!! :lol: